Biden’s First 100 Day’s; Monday’s Open Thread

Pardon Our Mess. Photo by Marty Mankins.

It’s Monday aka Easter is 10 days from now. Oops, my bad, I mistook March 29th, for what is really March 22nd, 2021.

10 day’s before Easter marks President Biden’s 61st day in office. It is President Biden’s 61st day in office, but Easter is not ten days away…

Thanks goes to jrc813jr for nitpicking and pointing out my math error.

For day 61 President Biden will receive his daily brief. At 7:00 p.m. D.C., time President Biden will meet virtually with the Senate Democratic Caucus during their annual retreat. That meeting is closed to the press.

When last we met on Friday President Biden hadn’t tweet. He ended up with 8 tweets and no retweets for Friday.

His first tweet was sent at 3:17 p.m. D.C., time in which he explains that he and Vice President Harris will be meeting with Asian American leaders in Georgia to discuss the increased attacks on the Asian community.

The meeting with Asian American leaders follows the deadly shooting on Tuesday evening in Atlanta, that left 8 day, 6 of those killed were Asian Americans.

In remarks on Friday President Biden said; Hate can have no safe harbor in America.  It must stop.  And it’s on all of us — all of us, together — to make it stop.

For his second tweet sent @ 3:56 p.m., D.C., time he urges Congress to “swiftly pass” the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act.

His full statement regarding his support of the bill:

Jill and I share the nation’s grief and outrage at the horrific killings of eight people, among them six Asian American women, in Georgia on March 16th.

While we do not yet know motive, as I said last week, we condemn in the strongest possible terms the ongoing crisis of gender-based and anti-Asian violence that has long plagued our nation. I urge Congress to swiftly pass the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act, which would expedite the federal government’s response to the rise of hate crimes exacerbated during the pandemic, support state and local governments to improve hate crimes reporting, and ensure that hate crimes information is more accessible to Asian American communities.  I thank Senator Hirono, Congresswoman Meng, and Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus Chairwoman Chu for their consistent leadership on this issue — and for their persistence in standing up for America’s values by standing strongly against anti-Asian xenophobia and hate.

During my first week in office, I signed a Presidential Memorandum to condemn and combat racism, xenophobia, and intolerance against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States. I directed the Department of Justice and the Department of Health and Human Services to help lead our nation’s efforts to stop anti-Asian bias, xenophobia, and harassment. Now, it’s time for Congress to codify and expand upon these actions — because every person in our nation deserves to live their lives with safety, dignity, and respect.

White House.gov. 03/19/2021.

In remarks on Friday from Atlanta, Georgia, President Biden also urged Congress to pass the bill.

I’m calling on Congress to pass and get my — to get to my desk the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act.  And the House just passed the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, a law I authored more than 25 years ago and is one of my proudest legislative achievements.  I call on the Senate to swiftly pass it and get it to my desk. 

The linked Presidential Memorandum was posted to White House.gov., on January 26th, 2021.

CNBC News explained on Friday that the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act “aims to increase Justice Department oversight of coronavirus-related hate crimes, provide support for state and local law enforcement agencies, and make hate crime information more accessible to Asian American communities.”

At 5:49 p.m. D.C., time he shares a live feed to remarks he gave following the meeting in Georgia.

His full remarks can be found @ White House.gov..

His opening remarks regarding the meeting with Asian American leaders:

The Vice President and I, as I said, met a little bit earlier, just before this, with leaders from the Asian American community here in Georgia. 

We talked about Tuesday’s mass shooting, about another example of public health crisis, of gun violence in this country.  Eight people killed, seven women.   Six were of Asian descent.  All fellow Americans.  Each one of them we mourn.

Their families are left with broken hearts and unanswered questions.  And the investigation is ongoing.  And the Vice President and I are being regularly updated by the Attorney General and the Director of the FBI, working closely with Governor Kemp and Mayor Bottoms and local officials. 

But whatever the motivation, we know this: Too many Asian Americans have been walking up and down the streets and worrying, waking up each morning the past year feeling their safety and the safety of their loved ones are at stake.  They’ve been attacked, blamed, scapegoated, and harassed.  They’ve been verbally assaulted, physically assaulted, killed. 

Documented incidents against — of hate against Asian Americans have seen a skyrocketing spike over the last year, let alone the ones that happened and never get reported.  It’s been a year of living in fear for their lives just to walk down the street.  Grandparents leave — to leave — afraid to leave their homes.  Small-business owners targeted and gunned down.  Attacks on some of the most vulnerable people in our nation — the elderly, low-wage workers, and women. 

In fact, Asian American women suffer twice as many incidents of harassment and violence as Asian American men.  We’re learning again what we’ve always known: Words have consequences.  It’s the coro- — it’s the coronavirus.  Full stop. 

The conversation we had today with the AAPI leaders, and that we’re hearing all across the country, is that hate and violence often hide in plain sight.  And it’s often met with silence.  That’s been true throughout our history, but that has to change — because our silence is complicity.  We cannot be complicit.  We have to speak out.  We have to act. 

In my first week in office, I signed an executive order directing federal agencies to combat this resurgence of xenophobia.  The Department of Justice is strengthening its partnership with the AAPI community to prevent these crimes, in addition to its other work to take on violent extremism and domestic terrorism. 

I’m calling on Congress to pass and get my — to get to my desk the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act. And the House just passed the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, a law I authored more than 25 years ago and is one of my proudest legislative achievements. I call on the Senate to swiftly pass it and get it to my desk.

But for all the good that laws can do, we have to change our hearts.  Hate can have no safe harbor in America.  It must stop.  And it’s on all of us — all of us, together — to make it stop.

White House.gov. 03/19/2021.

At 6:25 p.m. D.C., time he repeats the line “words have consequences.”

I think we can all agree he means the now former President Impeached Twice Asshole’s words, calling the virus the Chinese virus, elevating the words “Kung flu,” after reportedly an aide made that tasteless joke using the words “Kung flu,” when he says “words have consequences.”

@ 6:40 p.m. D.C., time he says that laws alone won’t be enough to combat hate, that we have to change our hearts.

@ 6:58 p.m. D.C., time he shares a clip from his Friday remarks.

The video clip is 1 minute and 4 seconds long.

President Biden: Too many Asian Americans have been walking up and down the streets and worrying, waking up each morning the past year feeling their safety and the safety of their loved ones are at stake. They’ve been attacked, blamed, scapegoated, and harassed. They’ve been verbally assaulted, physically assaulted, killed. Documented incidents against — of hate against Asian Americans have seen a skyrocketing spike over the last year, let alone the ones that happened and never get reported.  It’s been a year of living in fear for their lives just to walk down the street.  Grandparents leave — to leave — afraid to leave their homes.  Small-business owners targeted and gunned down.  Attacks on some of the most vulnerable people in our nation — the elderly, low-wage workers, and women. 

He shares another video from his remarks at 8 p.m. D.C., time.

The video is 34 seconds long.

President Biden: The conversation we had today with the AAPI leaders, and that we’re hearing all across the country, is that hate and violence often hide in plain sight.  And it’s often met with silence.  That’s been true throughout our history, but that has to change — because our silence is complicity.  We cannot be complicit.  We have to speak out.  We have to act. 

At 11:05 p.m. D.C., time he shared an image from his meeting with Asian American leaders.

For Saturday he tweeted 2 times.

His first tweet was posted at 10 a.m. D.C., time.

The video is 2 minutes and 33 seconds long and features snips of his conversation with Jocelyn a mother of 4 and grandmother to 8 from Virginia.

The snip focuses on how the passed American Rescue Plan will aid her and her family.

9:40 p.m. D.C., time he shares a picture of himself and Vice President Harris.

Sunday he posted 5 tweets and no retweets.

@ 9:30 a.m. D.C., time he lists things his administration have done since he took office.

The American Rescue Plan: Passed the Senate 50-49 on March 6th, 2021. Passed the House 220-211 on March 10th, 2021. Became law on March 11th, 2021.

Administered 100 million shots…

Rejoined the Paris Agreement: On January 20th, 2021, President Biden announced that the U.S., would rejoin the Paris Agreement. On February 19th, 2021, the U.S., officially rejoined the Paris Agreement.

On the 19th of February he tweeted:

Reversed the transgender military and Muslim bans: On January 25th, 2021, President Biden signed an executive order reversing the 2018 Transgender Military Ban. On January 20th, 2021, he revoked the previous admins travel ban regarding Muslim countries.

Expanded access to health care and voting: On January 20th, 2021, President Biden issued two executives orders restoring parts of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid. On March 7th, 2021, President Biden signed an executive order promoting access to voting.

Acted to end private prisons: On January 26th, 2021, President Biden signed an executive order that directed the Attorney General not to renew Department of Justice contracts with privately operated criminal detention facilities.

@ 3:00 p.m. D.C., time he shares a photo from the CDC headquarters in Atlanta.

President Biden and Vice President Harris visited the CDC on Friday as part of their trip to Atlanta, Georgia.

@ 4:30 p.m. D.C., time he shares a chart regarding the coronavirus vaccine progress.

According to the CDC data on vaccines as of Sunday morning, 124,481,412 doses have been administered.

At 5:31 p.m. D.C., time he shares a video from March 17th, 2021, aka St. Patrick’s Day.

The video is 55 seconds long. The first 27 seconds of the video is bagpipes playing.

President Biden: Thank you. My mother thanks you. Jean Finnegan thanks you. God love you, man. You play incredibly well. Thank you. What a nice thing to do. [The bagpipe player says; Happy St. Patrick’s Day to you, sir] Happy st. Patrick’s Day! Want to turn this way? [President Biden and the bagpipe player pose for photos.] Erin go bragh [Ireland Forever].

Google translate says that Ireland forever in Irish is Éire go deo which is possibly what President Biden concludes the video with meaning the text provided with the video is just incorrect.

To finish Sunday at 7:00 p.m. D.C., time President Biden urges American’s to continue to wear masks.

Please continue to wear your mask, even as more people get vaccinated, the danger of the coronavirus is still real.

For Monday President Biden has tweeted 1 time and retweeted zero times so far.

10:30 a.m. D.C., time he talks about the American Rescue Plan.

$1400 x’s 4 =’s the $5600 in direct payment assistance’s provided in the American Rescue Plan.


The daily White House press briefing is scheduled for 12:30 p.m. D.C., time two likely questions asked are when is President Biden going to travel to the U.S., border and is his first press conference still scheduled for Thursday. The press conference answer will possibly be included in White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki’s opening remarks.

On Sunday President Biden was asked if he was thinking about going to the border, he replied;  At some point, I will.  Yes.

Live Feed: The White House.

This is an open thread

About the opinions in this article…

Any opinions expressed in this article are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of this website or of the other authors/contributors who write for it.

About Tiff 2655 Articles
Member of the Free Press who is politically homeless and a political junkie.