Debunking Planet X / Nibiru

Dang.  I liked Jupiter.  It’s a shame it was destroyed.

Were you unaware that the planet Jupiter was destroyed by the collision with another planet, Nibiru?  Well, then, you’ve been listening to those crazy “scientists” again.  You should have been listening to Nancy Lieder, of Zetatalk.  (www.zetatalk.com)

Or, wait… no, you probably shouldn’t.  Although many people have.

Nancy Lieder’s claim that a rogue planet named Nibiru is on a collision course toward Earth was first made public in 1995.  For those that wonder at the source of such information, unbeknownst to astronomers (more on that in a minute) the answer is simple: Nancy isn’t the one that discovered the information.  She’s merely acting as a conduit for aliens from Zeta Reticuli, who implanted a device in her brain that allows her to receive their transmissions.

The reason you haven’t heard about this on the news is because there’s a conspiracy among astronomers and world governments to keep this information from the general public.  Their motivation is simple: prevent panic.  They all know that the world is going to end shortly, so why make the final few weeks a nightmare of panic and fear?

As a person who was seriously contemplating voting for SMOD, there were times in recent years where the news of a planet-destroying collision would have evoked some depression and resignation but not necessarily panic or fear.  Beyond that, however, the rationale is used to explain away any rebuttal from those with scientific knowledge.

Lest you think this is a true fringe belief, there’s a report from NASA about it, released in 2011.  It reads, in part:

(A)n astonishing number of people “are watching YouTube videos and visiting slick websites with nothing in their skeptical toolkit,” in the words of David Morrison, a planetary astronomer at NASA Ames Research Center and senior scientist at the NASA Astrobiology Institute and NASA Lunar Science Institute.

Morrison estimates that there are 2 million websites discussing the impending Nibiru-Earth collision. He receives, on average, five email inquiries about Nibiru every day. “At least a once a week I get a message from a young person ― as young as 11 ― who says they are ill and/or contemplating suicide because of the coming doomsday,” Morrison said.

The collision was due to happen in 2012, though, after originally being scheduled for 2003.  After no collision occurred, people stopped believing in it.

Or at least a handful did.  Many of the others dug in their heels.  On April 23 of this year, we were due to finally see the proof of Nibiru’s existence.

From Fox News:

According to Meade, the alignment represents “the Lion of the tribe of Judah,” marking the Rapture, the belief that Christ will bring the faithful into paradise prior to a period of tribulation on earth that precedes the end of time.

Meade said he believes the so-called Planet X, which is also known as Nibiru, will appear above the sky on the April date, causing volcanic eruptions, tsunamis and earthquakes.

They go on to admit that NASA has consistently denied any evidence of the existence of planet X.

It’s not just NASA, though.  Observatories throughout the world report the continued existence of Jupiter and the lack of any large planet moving toward Earth.  Also, the people who have announced the incipient destruction of the world keep getting the date wrong, and pushing it back after apocalyptic collisions fail to materialize.

This conspiracy has two classic earmarks of a successful conspiracy theory.  1) An explanation of why all experts can’t be trusted and 2) large quantities of believers.

After people have been convinced to not believe anything that all external-to-the-group experts may say, whether due to perceived bias or a giant cover-up, they are rarely willing to do what they consider to be a waste of their time listening to explanations of why they’re wrong.  This is the mechanism used by political parties, as well, by attempting to discredit everything a potential rival may say.  Calling all reports “fake news” for example, or for a lesser example describing a pundit as purely an entertainer.

Also, the larger the group, the more likely people are to accept its positions as reasonable.  “Two million Americans can’t be wrong.”  Although, of course, large quantities of people are wrong on a regular basis.  Any number of people may believe in the same misapprehension.  It’s why we pursue knowledge, to stop being wrong so often.

At least, why some people pursue knowledge.  Others just sit around waiting for Nibiru to strike.

 

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About AlienMotives 1775 Articles
Ex-Navy Reactor Operator turned bookseller. Father of an amazing girl and husband to an amazing wife. Tired of willful political blindness, but never tired of politics. Hopeful for the future.